Ask this question to ten people you will get 10 different answers. The problem with defining quality is related to personal view point of cost versus quality. The person answering always wants to define the requirements in a way a product marketer would. This is not necessary. Quality is conformance to requirements. It is as simple as those three words. A carnival toy can be high quality yet still junk. High quality because it meets the criteria of the seller, junk because it is made to sell not last long. The designer may spec inferior grade feed stock and inconsistent tolerances to a manufacturer. If the manufacture flawlessly reproduces those products within those requirements than it is producing product with a high quality output. Understanding that the buyer then must be quick to educate themselves what the specs should be for the implied buyer/seller agreement. Most people assume high price equals high quality because it is implied that the designer has established a high standard of criteria to the manufacture. The manufacture then replicates the product with high fidelity thus producing a high quality product. Because of the purity of resources and professional time and skill required the price point will be sufficiently high to impart quid pro quo value for price.

Ask this question to 10 people you will get 10 different answers. The problem with defining quality is related to the personal viewpoint of cost vs. quality. The person answering always wants to define the requirements in a way a product marketer would. This is not necessary. Quality is conformance to requirements. It is as simple as those three words.

A carnival toy can be high quality yet still junk. High quality, because it meets the criteria of the seller, junk because it is not made last, it was made to sell. In this example, the designer may spec inferior grade feedstock and low precision to a manufacturer. If the manufacturer flawlessly reproduces those products within those requirements than it is producing the product with a high-quality output. Its about fidelity to requirements that lends itself to the quality label.

Understanding this, the buyer then must be quick to educate themselves what design specs should be considered relevant to the implied buyer/seller agreement. Most people assume high price equates to high quality because it is implied that the designer has established a high standard of criteria to the manufacturer, and the manufacturer replicates the product with high fidelity thus yielding a high-quality product.

The price is usually higher because the cost of goods, resources and professional time and skill required dictate price point. Profit is the reward. This is an implied quid pro quo value for the price agreement of the retail world.

Now the watch out word for everybody is value. Value is the performance vs cost relationship. Evaluating cost The performance attributes are unique to a product category, Floors, sinks, lights, etc. that every consumer can set:

  1. life expectancy of the product. 
  2. Expectation from normal wear and tear
  3. Expectation from tolerance to high wear and tear.
  4. ability to repair or fix
  5. burden to repair, replace of fix
  6. resilience to trama and chance of failure
  7. affordability or cost

If you look at the curve below you can see the relationship we all are familiar with. The higher the cost the higher the expected value. When mapped against the standard performance attributes this makes sense. Unscrupulous retailers may misrepresent value by misrepresenting any of these standard performance attributes. To help you with the shopping experience We have gone one step further an segmented the products in the catalog into three value categories. Good, Better, Best. If you look at the table below you will find an annotation of those meanings. Happy shopping.